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Therapists are People Too


By Amy Vickrey, MSE

In my time as a teacher, I worked with many therapists. They are wonderful people with a wealth of information and resources! I also had the opportunity through one program I worked in to participate in home visits. If you are considering or have therapists who come to your home, here are some things to consider to help everyone be more comfortable.

  • If you offer a drink, offer something that comes prepackaged like bottled water. Your therapist may not comfortable drinking out of other people’s cups like I was due to my food sensitivities.
  • Most will not accept offers of food or drink...they are encouraged to take care of these needs between visits.
  • Most will not use the bathrooms as they do not want to make you feel uncomfortable about them being in your house. If you are okay with them using the bathroom, it is ok for you to let them know in case there is ever a need. They might still say no.
  • If there are changes occurring in the home, it might be important to share so that the therapist can take this into consideration if your child slows down or regresses in therapy.
  • Before or after, save a few minutes of time to ask questions and let them know about progress or issues that arise related to the therapy. You see your child every day, they see them once or twice a week. You may see something before they do and it helps to set a bigger picture.
  • Talk to them about any questions and concerns that you may have, even if they seem unrelated. Many therapists have worked in teams with other specialists and can at least steer you in the right direction for concerns you have.
  • Share good things you are doing to help therapy along, like practicing skills, adding cross-midline exercises or even supplements that might be beneficial!
  • It’s ok to listen in, take notes, or watch what the therapist is doing so you can learn about how to help your child too!
  • Say "Thank You!" Even just a verbal thank you, a card made by your child, or praise for the work they are doing is appreciated! Many companies don’t allow the acceptance of gifts (especially if they are valued over a certain amount) but a simple thank you is always appreciated!

Are you looking for more ideas on how to incorporate therapy into your homeschooling?  Then make sure to check out our at At Home Therapy Resouces as well as the SPED Homeschool Therapy Partners page.


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